Britt Marie Was Here

Book
9781473617209

By Fredrik Backman

avg rating

8 reviews

The number 1 European bestseller by the author of the international phenomenon A Man Called Ove, Britt-Marie was Here is a funny, poignant and uplifting tale of love, community, and second chances.

Reviews

23 Aug 2016

I loved this book. I was a little apprehensive as I had enjoyed A Man called Ove so much and was not sure that this would match it. It did - I was soon drawn into the story and 'rooted' for Britt-Marie from the very beginning. I could share her need for order and her incredulity about football and its followers. I again enjoyed the gentle style and understated humour.

It was interesting to see her - like Ove - gently absorbed into the local community and her long held views of life challenged so she is forced to make real choices for herself.

A read which made me think and smile.

Heather Howarth

24 Sep 2016

I did find the book a little difficult at first to identify with the character. A little to obsessive and ocd for me.I was a little irritated by her ways of finding a job and the single thought process she used. She did slowly grow in statue and her views and i dI'd thaw and warm to her ways. A good not too intensive read perfect for a weekend curled up by the woodburner.
I'll read the authors other book as I did enjoy the gentle easy style of writing

24 Sep 2016

Liz-anne

What a wonderful book. We would definitely recommend this book. The world would be a nicer place if we had more people like Britt-Marie. Fredrik Backman can tell a story where you can laugh on one page, shed a tear on the next but you finish with a contented smile.

We rated this 5/5

29 Sep 2016

I read this book (as a free review copy) shortly after reading a Man called Ove (Book Club Read) and thought it couldn’t be as good – it was. Throughout the novel Britt-Marie often mentions her husband Kent. She walked out of their 40 year marriage after some years of neglect and his affair. She manages to get a job working as a caretaker at a recreation centre, 12 miles away from where she and Kent lived, in a small run-down village. The story of how she got the job and her relationship with the girl in the job agency is hilarious.

At 63, newly separated housewife, Britt-Marie, (a woman with OCD about cleanliness), can be a stubborn, outspoken, judgemental and has rules for how everyone should behave. At first I didn’t really like her but as the novel unfolds I found myself really wanting Britt-Marie to succeed and be happy.

Stepping into the driver seat of her own life, without the safety belt of her husband, so to speak
Britt-Marie is determined she can make it on her own. Her involvement with the local kids and soccer (which she hated) brings her purpose, joy and friendships that are funny, sad and deeply moving.

Britt-Marie makes friends with a rat, her constant companion is baking soda and she learns to love soccer. The novel is wonderful quirky and had me laughing and crying. I raced through the novel wanted to know what choice Britt-Marie was going to make with her life and was disappointed and pleased in the same moment.

Would I recommend this book – absolutely, without a shadow of a doubt.

07 Oct 2016

Glynis

Hunstanworth Village Hall Book Group received a lovely set of hardback books from RGFE to review. Our group liked the cover, we felt that it would appeal to a primarily female audience and before reading wondered how the novel would manage to combine a male dominated sport (not saying women don't enjoy football...just perhaps not so much) into the story of 63 year old Britt-Marie.
Fredrick Backman succeeds in bringing Britt-Marie to life. An older woman who finds her world upside down, no longer married, never worked and no friends or family. Britt-Marie with her OCD quirks and strong moral code ends up in a small town of Borg where she is soon 'befriended' by the small community. The story develops as Britt-Marie helps them, but is it really a case of them of them helping Britt-Marie?
The book group felt the characters in this novel were well written and well rounded, there was a lot of humour and pathos but this was well balanced.
After reading this you'll also be looking up the uses for Bicarbonate of Soda and wondering how you ever managed without this in your life...oh, and the football side of the story (which is a very important element) works really well too.

27 Oct 2016

This was a lovely story about Britt-Marie, a woman set in her ways, having to readjust to leaving her husband and getting a new job.

It's heartwarming and funny in places, but heartbreaking towards the end.

I loved the subtle humour used in this book and the writers style is quite unique.

Britt-Marie is a type of person that we all know and sometimes roll our eyes at, but I loved her character development and reading her journey throughout the book.

10 Feb 2017

Kathleen Milne

Not usually a fan of 'funny' books - this bittersweet one captured my heart. The sad/humour is delicately handled, as is the philosophy. A touch of genius to couple Britt's obsessive behaviour with football fervour. Britt's 'innocence' is replicated in her bizarre friends - all showing evidence of the human condition which we recognise. A perfect ending!! A winner!
Would recommend.

28 Feb 2017

I read this book (as a free review copy) shortly after reading a Man called Ove (Book Club Read) and thought it couldn’t be as good – it was. Throughout the novel Britt-Marie often mentions her husband Kent. She walked out of their 40 year marriage after some years of neglect and his affair. She manages to get a job working as a caretaker at a recreation centre, 12 miles away from where she and Kent lived, in a small run-down village. The story of how she got the job and her relationship with the girl in the job agency is hilarious.

At 63, newly separated housewife, Britt-Marie, (a woman with OCD about cleanliness), can be a stubborn, outspoken, judgemental and has rules for how everyone should behave. At first I didn’t really like her but as the novel unfolds I found myself really wanting Britt-Marie to succeed and be happy.

Stepping into the driver seat of her own life, without the safety belt of her husband, so to speak
Britt-Marie is determined she can make it on her own. Her involvement with the local kids and soccer (which she hated) brings her purpose, joy and friendships that are funny, sad and deeply moving.

Britt-Marie makes friends with a rat, her constant companion is baking soda and she learns to love soccer. The novel is wonderful quirky and had me laughing and crying. I raced through the novel wanted to know what choice Britt-Marie was going to make with her life and was disappointed and pleased in the same moment.

Would I recommend this book – absolutely, without a shadow of a doubt.

From the noticeboard